Lovin’ Riding More

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I really like riding my bicycle.  I thought about this after I saw an article quoting Bradley Wiggins where he said, when asked if he missed cycling – No. As much as I love cycling, it’s come full circle and I hate the thing now. I haven’t been on the bike since the Six Days of Gent back in November.

I never was a big Bradley Wiggins fan and this just confirms my overall view of the guy.

I guess he looked at the sport as a job and not as a life choice.  I have thought of cycling as a job, a very few times, when I was suffering miserably and could only try to justify that by saying someone was paying to do it.  But, I can count those times on one hand.

Since I had a TBI last October, cycling has been the biggest part of “the cure”.  I was sleeping less than an hour a night until I started riding indoors after a month. Instantly I started sleeping over 4 hours, which was a game changer.

Since then, always the best I feel is when I’m riding.  I have no idea the reason why, but it somehow makes my body sync better to the current situation.

Plus, I just like riding my bike.  I like riding it with friends, meeting other riders,  or just alone, checking out the surroundings.  There is no better speed to absorb your surrounding than on a bicycle.  Walking is too slow and driving is way too fast normally.

I’m a little tweaked right now.  I’m trying to address the minor stuff that is left over from October.  My shoulders were screwed up from October, but I hurt my left one a bit more in Moab.  Maybe more than a little more, but I’ll find that out soon.

So I’m just sort of riding around, enjoying the scenery.  That is fine.  I’m not really on a agenda.  I’d like to be, but I don’t think I am in control of that currently.  It is a slow process, but at least I can still reap the rewards from the freedom that cycling gives.

Guess I’m gonna pass 3000 miles today for the year.

 

 

 

16 thoughts on “Lovin’ Riding More

  1. Larry T

    As the Aussies would say, “Good on ya!” (or something like that). Far too many get into cycling as a business/job through a love of riding a bike – then see it all evaporate. Think of the ex-pros or others in the biz who touch bikes only to work on them or sell them, they’ve long since given up the actual riding of them. Really sad when you think cycling is one activity you can enjoy pretty much up until you’re dead, unlike stick-and-ball sports and the like. W CICLISMO!

     
  2. Bolas Azules

    Some people are pulled into the sport for different reasons, from different places. Some get pulled in because they are simply good at it, have a great fit from a body / engine perspective, some use the sport to ‘get off of the farm’ or to leave a tough life or area, some to use the sport to escape or ‘see the world’…..good for you for doing it for the love of riding but we are all different.

     
  3. Fausto

    With Wiggins dad a PRO, he had the genetics. Freud would have a lot to say about him having to surpass his absentee dad’s accomplishments, blah blah blah. Either way, a rare talent who went from the top of track to road to track with all the medals and jerseys to show for it. I remember after the London Olympic TT gold he was caught at a pub smoking. In essence he said he just couldn’t live like a monk anymore and you can’t take the Lad out of the pro athlete.

     
    1. Chris

      Rather than not smoking for his asthma, Wiggins got a TUE for cortisone injections.

      He’s a fraud, good riddance.

       
  4. conrad

    I have always appreciated the riders that are out there for the love of riding the most. Even if they aren’t winning. As a friend says: “whoever has the most fun wins”.

     
  5. LA LA 70.2

    Like me Sir Bradley is a Rock Star!! Dammit where did Sheryl go!? Oh well off to challenge Vino at the TexAss 70.2 wish me luck Doods!!

     
  6. Sillypuddy

    Yes Wiggins was amazing. I heard he also makes a hella good lobster bisque and strolls down to the pub and throw a mean dart. Be nice to c him try mtn biking or even triathlons. The guy has been dealt all the right cards.
    Sillypuddy OUT!

     
  7. Pete Townsend

    What I cant hear you? We all voted Sir Bradley into The Who to take my place as Ive grown old n in the way. Who’s Next?!

     
  8. BZ

    When your racing, winning, and managing other peoples exceptions at the top end of the sport races like Paris-Roubaix, the Tour, the Olmpics, Tour of California, Paris-Nice, and the world championships cycling does amount to a job.

    If your racing the local spring fling and sprinting for the next stop signs vs people with real jobs, families, and less than gaudy hematocrit levels, cycling can be defines as a diversion.

    Why judge?

     
      1. Jake

        ST wrote: “I never was a big Bradley Wiggins fan and this just confirms my overall view of the guy.”

        Jeez Steve, seems you were judging. Did you forget what you wrote?

         
    1. Bryan Barber

      Everyone has expectations to manage. That never justifies acting like a douche.
      Paris-Roubaix was his idea and Tour of Cali was a vacation.
      Wiggins is a “cyclist” and Tilford is a “rider”. The difference is the “love”.
      I love riding my bike, too!

       
  9. wallymann

    i have a different view. i think wiggo was a long-time cycling fan, since childhood. has a great collection of legendary bikes, knows the history of racing and racers palmares, etc. i think he grew to hate the pro side of the sport, with all the expectations and drama and bullshit. it’s well documented that he’s always had a hate-hate relationship with the fame side of the sport.

    take away all the latter, i think he’d be just another bloke that likes to ride his bike.

     
    1. DR

      Everyone starts out loving to ride their bike. I think at the highest level of the sport it’s the eleven month season, five to six hours a day on the bike, having to watch everything that you eat and being bothered by fans if you go out of your house. Do this for twelve or fifteen years and I can see why some hang up their bike and never ride it again. Turning something you love into a job can ruin it. Hopefully he finds that love for riding again.

       
    2. Bryan Barber

      Wallyman, I have a lot of respect for the work and accomplishments Wiggins has made in bicycle racing.
      I find it pathetic and repulsive that someone like he, who has reaped such tremendous rewards from the sport, can in-turn treat the sport with such disdain.

      “….all the expectations and drama and bullshit”

      He bought into it. Promoted it. And was rewarded greatly for it.
      Good Riddance, Whiner!

       

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