Under the Knife

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By the time most of you read this, I’ll hopefully be done with this shoulder surgery. The surgery was moved up to 7 am this morning from 9 am. The meeting yesterday with the doctor didn’t go as well as I had hoped. Actually, I’m not really positive how it went. I’m nearly positive I have the right guy doing this, but I did get squeezed in last minute, so I had to work around them.

I spent a pretty long time just sitting and waiting, nearly all afternoon. By the time that Dr. Millett came in, I had lost my train of thought about the questions I had. He was checking out the important parts of the MRI with his fellow guy, so I was listening more to what they were talking about. So, I still have a few questions, but I guess I can ask them after the fact.

I do know that my shoulder isn’t so good. The doctor did say that he has seen worse, which I took as a good statement? I said something like I suppose there is a low percentage of attaching the big retraction and he said, no, he was going to attach it, maybe not all of it, but he said he would fix it, which was all I wanted to hear I guess.

When the doctor was talking in code, I did understand that they aren’t going to be doing this arthroscopically. The are going to cut open my whole shoulder to get at the one tendon. I heard something about a patch too, which I realize now is a graft from a cadaver, which doesn’t thrill me much. I guess they drill into my bone and get some stem cells out of the marrow and sandwich them into the attachment area and then inject some platelets, that they spun out of my blood, into the whole area. This is just generally what I got out of the whole thing.

I do know that I’m spending the night in the hospital, which I didn’t plan to do. I asked about the PT after the procedure and he said something like, “In a case as extensive as this, we might just want to leave it still for a while.” I’m wondering what a while is here. Guess I’ll know that later too. I’m just going with it now.

Okay, hopefully I’ll be drugged up enough to be able to post something later, or by tomorrow at the latest. It will probably have to be short, since pecking with my left hand will probably be a tad frustrating. We’ll see. Okay, heading over Vail pass to get this whole thing over with. Ciao.

There were tons of hockey and football jerseys in the hallways and examination rooms of the Steadman Clinic.  One that surprised me was a sign jersey from Alex Steida.

There were tons of hockey and football jerseys in the hallways and examination rooms of the Steadman Clinic. One that surprised me was a sign jersey from Alex Steida.

How about this great deal for a parking space for your car?

How about this great deal for a parking space for your car?

Trudi and Bromont playing in downtown Vail.

Trudi and Bromont playing in downtown Vail.

Bromont wanting to check out the ski hill.

Bromont wanting to check out the ski hill.

Bromont posing like he does a lot.

Bromont posing like he does a lot.

This is a Breg Polar Pack that my friend Stacey had the Breg guys send to me in Silverthorne.  It circulates cold water to a shoulder bag, reducing inflammation and such.

This is a Breg Polar Pack that my friend Stacey had the Breg guys send to me in Silverthorne. It circulates cold water to a shoulder bag, reducing inflammation and such.

14 thoughts on “Under the Knife

  1. Doug Punches

    Good luck Steve!

    Use that Polar Pack as much as possible. I was hit by a car 4-years ago and broke by collarbone in 4-places, which required a plate and screws.

    I used a Polar Pack and that thing was awesome. Pain was minimal and swelling was almost non-existent.

     
  2. davidh

    No news to you but Bromont is one handsome dog. Good luck, both today and with the recovery. The Polar Pack looks like genius.

     
  3. Pat Long

    So glad Trudi and Bromont are with you. The Polar Pack is inspired! It make so much sense. Heal well, and take care, Steve.

     
  4. Denny Thiel

    Steve, I had the open procedure. Had my arm in a sling 12 weeks (was supposed too, probably wasn’t near the end). With 29 visits to PT. 2 or 3 times a week starting maybe 6 weeks after surgery. I think I used the the polar pack 2 weeks. It worked like a dream. The most painful area was down by my elbow at the other end of tendon. I could only tolerate prescribed pain meds a few day before my GI. objected. I used something to reduce swelling but gave up the hydrocodone or whatever it was. Today the repaired shoulder is better than the other. It was definitely worth it.

    You are a multi-time Cycling World Champion the doctors want you as their patient as much as you need their skills.

    Take Care.

     
  5. Beaster

    STeve, just lay there and let them “do they’re thing” – ya – they don’t call these guys “carpenters” in med school for nuthin’……….. Nice shot of the Steida jersey – I remember how the 7-11 train would tee him up with a kilo or so to go in a crit. He was an amazing anaerobic finishing ANIMAL & with 7-11 blocking for ya, it was almost like calling it in!

    Godspeed in your recovery & may I suggest using a rowing machine when the time is right in your recovery process.

    Brian

     
  6. Just one guy

    1. Listen, LISTEN to the docs.

    2. Take it easy. For once.

    3. You have no idea, but you might be getting the hint by now.

     
  7. Kevin Lyons

    My wife had basically the same surgery at the Mayo Clinic 2 years ago. Important hints: take the pain killers, don’t argue, get a recliner chair, like a lazy-boy for sleeping. lots of pillows.
    good luck, you will be fine, it will take longer than you think.
    Kevin

     
  8. I like Bromont

    Steve,
    I have never had this surgery. Good luck w/ the rehab. Last time I stayed in Vail, I loved it. Riding around up and out of the valley. Im not sure I want to dip my feet in that stream this time of year though. Its cold enough in July! I have come to the conclusion that if I was a hot shot surgeon, I to would practice out of Vail. Cheers.

     

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